Can Dell Swerve PC Market With 'Wearable Technology'?

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Dell is exploring the option of wearable technology after taking inspiration from Google Glass and watch-based computing.

Editor’s note:  As part of our special editorial partnership, Channelnomics is publishing this recent article from CRN in the UK.

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PC maker Dell Inc. is looking to offset the impact of the shrinking PC market on its business by investing in the "wearable technology" market.

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Google Inc. has taken the first steps into the space with its Google Glass technology and rumors continue to abound about the imminent launch of Apple Corp.'s  iWatch. Dell's vice president of personal computing Sam Burd revealed that his firm could be next to throw its hat into the ring.

Speaking to the Guardian, Burd said that while the firm has not announced a wearable technology move yet, it is "exploring ideas in that space."

"Looking ahead five years, we expect devices and form factors to continue to change. There will still be a need for 'static' computing on desktops, but there will be a real need for mobile devices," he said. "There is a lot of discussion about how that fits into wearable technology like we have seen with Google Glass and watches. We are looking at a world of lots of connected devices. I do not see any magic new form factor like the iPad -- I don't think anybody saw how that was going to change devices. But the number of [computing] devices per person is exploding."

The PC market recorded the worst quarter since records began earlier this year, shrinking annually by 13.9 percent, way ahead of the forecast of just 7.7 percent.

Dell's end-user computing division, made up mainly by its PC business, shrank annually by nine percent to $8.9 billion in the three months to 3 May. Burd added that despite the bad press, the PC market is not dead yet.

"The PC business is important to us. It's how we started as a company, and where we have strong share globally," he said. "Lots has been written about the demise of the PC business, [but] we think it's an interesting area going forward.

"It is encouraging to see some businesses deploying Windows 8 and tablets. It's going to take some time, and the jury is still out. IDC's numbers say that Windows 8 on tablets is still far smaller than the iPad, but there are successes."

For more UK channel coverage from CRN, visit www.channelweb.co.uk

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