Gartner Predicts Rising Big Data Demands

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Gartner predicts that, by 2015, many major vendors will incorporate natural language capabilities and Hadoop technology to create more viable and powerful Big Data analytical engines.

Big DataBig Data may have some big hurdles in the near future. Technology research firm Gartner Inc. has predicted business intelligence and analytics will need to scale to meet the "robust growth" in data sources. Translation: Big Data vendors need to do more with a greater swath of business information resources.

Easier said than done, but Gartner isn't wrong. The more proactive vendors are about incorporating Big Data technology, the more quickly it can be disseminated to partners, customers and the rest of the world. Naturally, Gartner offers a few ideas and predictions on how that will happen:

Related articles
  • Hadoop Integration: By 2015, Gartner believes 65 percent of prepackaged analytic applications will have Hadoop already embedded. Gartner cites Hadoop's ability to deal with unstructured data and its behavior analysis as some of the critical features it needs to be a major player in the space. Gartner also sees a rising trend in "Hadoop-enabled database management systems" to help organizations deploy appliances and apps (virtual or physical) with Big Data capabilities baked-in.
  • Natural Language Capabilities: Gartner says businesses have been misguided in "their rush to port applications to mobile and tablet devices," and instead, should have been more focused  on natural language capabilities. By 2016, Gartner insists 70 percent of the "leading" business intelligence vendors will have incorporated natural language as ideal input methods for queries, and that new virtual personal assistants will crop up, much like Apple Inc.'s Siri. Gartner believes a dialogue-style approach to fishing through data makes the most sense, especially for complex searches.
  • Structured & Unstructured Support: Valuable information doesn't typically sit in neat zeros and ones waiting to be uncovered -- there's also unstructured data. Gartner says that, by 2015, 30 percent of analytic projects will deliver their insights by leveraging both. That "previously untapped source of data" will be easier to unearth, fueling ongoing Big Data development, helping uncover ways to create business intelligence from previously nonviable data. Text, e-mails, audio and video sources are a few examples of unstructured data set to be lassoed in.

Be sure to also check out the latest predictions from RSA, the security division of EMC Corp., which attest Big Data analytics will drive proactive intelligence-based security methods that will become "a way of life."

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